National WIC Association

Oral Health

All content tagged with the term "oral-health".


  • A longitudinal study of dental caries risk among very young low-SES children

    April 1, 2009 - Bibliography
    Early childhood caries (ECC) is a challenging public health problem, both in the US and elsewhere. Unfortunately, data relating to very young children’s risk factors are scarce. This study assessed baseline risk factors for 18-month caries prevalence, in conjunction with a longitudinal study of high-risk children. Results suggested that early colonization by mutans streptocci (MS) and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages are significant predictors of ECC in high-risk populations.


  • Predictors of oral health counseling by WIC providers

    September 1, 2006 - Bibliography
    The authors assessed selected predictors for the inclusion of oral health counseling by Illinois WIC providers. The results suggested that when WIC providers had some oral health training, they  were more likely to provide counseling about dental disease and its prevention.


  • Determinants of dental referral practices among WIC nutritionists in North Carolina

    December 1, 2005 - Bibliography
    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of knowledge and confidence on dental referral practices among WIC nutritionists in North Carolina. The study showed that the more confident WIC nutritionists felt about their ability to assess oral health risk, the more likely they were to make dental referrals. Because a child’s first point of contact with a health professional is frequently at a WIC clinic, WIC workers might improve children’s access to dental care, by providing screenings and referrals.


  • Reducing disparities in dental care for low-income Hispanic children

    August 1, 2005 - Bibliography
    This study used a social ecological model to examine the influences of sociodemographic factors, mothers’ attitudes, financial barriers, and the health care delivery system on the use of dental services for 4- to 8-year-old Hispanic children. The results showed that initiating dental care during the preschool years was significantly related to the mothers’ beliefs and their social networks’ beliefs in the value of preventive dental care. In addition, extended clinic hours increased the likelihood of returning to the dentist. Provider availability, dental insurance, and family income were related to frequency of planned visits.


  • The effects of the Women, Infants, and Children’s supplemental food program on dentally related Medicaid expenditures

    June 1, 2004 - Bibliography
    The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of WIC on young children’s dentally related Medicaid expenditures. The results revealed that the WIC Program had the potential to decrease dentally related Medicaid costs, while increasing the use of dental services.


  • Effects of WIC participation on children’s use of oral health services

    May 1, 2004 - Bibliography
    The authors estimated the effects of the WIC Program on dental services use by Medicaid children in North Carolina. According to the results, children who participated in WIC had an increased probability of having a dental visit, were more likely to use preventive and restorative services, and were less likely to use emergency services.


  • The effects of Women, Infants, and Children’s supplemental food program on dentally related Medicaid expenditures

    April 1, 2004 - Bibliography
    This study estimated the effects of the WIC Program on dental-related Medicaid expenditures for young children. The researchers concluded that the WIC Program had the potential to decrease dental-related costs to the Medicaid program, while increasing use of dental services.


  • Caries prevalence of children in an infant oral health educational program at a WIC clinic

    September 1, 2003 - Bibliography
    The study compared the prevalence of caries between children whose parents had previously participated in an infant oral health education program at a WIC clinic with those whose parents had not participated in such a program. The study results showed that parents’ previous WIC education program participation was highly associated with lower carious lesions. The research indicated that WIC could have a positive impact on caries prevention.