National WIC Association


WIC promotes breastfeeding as the optimal infant feeding choice. NWA seeks to highlight WIC's role as an advocate and resource for breastfeeding promotion and support.

Fast Facts


The percentage of WIC mothers who initiated breastfeeding in 2010.


The number of steps NWA outlines for WIC clinics to achieve breastfeeding goals.

Related Blog Posts

August 4, 2014
Strengthening Families’ Health with WIC Breastfeeding Support

Celebrate WIC during National Breastfeeding Month!

January 23, 2014
Celebrating 40 Years of Strengthening Families

Watch our infographic videos created to celebrate WIC's 40th anniversary!

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Related Research

December 1, 2013
WIC participation and breastfeeding among white and black mothers: data from Mississippi

This study investigated the association between WIC participation and breastfeeding behaviors among white and black women in Mississippi. Analyses of data from the 2004–2008 Mississippi Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System revealed that 52.2 % of white women and 82.1 % of black women participated in WIC. A total of 60.4 % of white women and 39.7 % of black women initiated breastfeeding, and 26.5 % and 21.9 %, respectively, were breastfeeding at 10 weeks postpartum. WIC participation was negatively associated with breastfeeding initiation among whites, but not blacks. 

December 1, 2012
Social and institutional factors that affect breastfeeding duration among WIC participants in Los Angeles County, California

The authors investigated the impact of in-hospital breastfeeding, receipt of a formula discharge pack, and maternal return to work on the long-term breastfeeding outcomes of 4,725 WIC participants in Los Angeles County, California. It was found that mothers who exclusively breastfed in the hospital were 8 times as likely to reach the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation of breastfeeding for 12 months or longer, than mothers who did not breastfeed in the hospital.

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Why It Matters

  • Breastfed infants have a reduced risk of infections, asthma, obesity, and SIDS compared with formula fed infants.
  • Breastfeeding mothers have a reduced risk of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and postpartum depression compared to mothers who don't breastfeed.
  • It's estimated that $13 billion would be saved per year if 90% of U.S. infants were breastfed exclusively for six months.

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